Month: May 2020

The Book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience by Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton (2019)

This is remarkable: the stories of over 130 courageous women and their contributions in one book! In the introduction, the authors, Hillary and Chelsea, are clear about their motive: “Power has largely been associated with – and defined – by men since the beginning of time. Yet women have painted, written, created, discovered, invented and led for just as long. It’s simply that their work is more likely to go unrecognized – sometimes for centuries. We believe it is past time for that to change”(ix). Not delving too deeply into any one woman’s story, they remind us that if...

Read More

Thank you, Deborah Feldman

Something happened to me this month which changed my life: I discovered Deborah Feldman. Feldman is the author of the autobiographies Unorthodox and Exodus: a Memoir, which detail her journey growing up in the Satmar Hasidic Jewish community in New York, her escape from this community, and later roots trip through Europe. Feldman’s work traces a line from her present day life in Berlin directly backwards to her family’s persecution at the hands of the Nazis. While reading her work and listening to her interviews, it often felt as if Feldman was speaking directly to me, and her message...

Read More

Systemic Racism and the Monsters it Makes of White People

In her book, They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South, Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers details through exhaustive research the role white women played in the slave trade of the American South. In this intricately detailed book she displays how white women were empowered by being slave owners, and used this power consciously and intentionally to abuse, exploit and often engage in the commerce of black bodies and lives—separating the enslaved from their loved ones—to leverage their position in society and financially advance themselves. In contrast to previously promoted depictions that white women in the...

Read More

Zora Neale Hurston: Hiding Places

In 1942, writer, folklorist, and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston rented a room on the second floor of a house in St. Augustine, Florida, and during this time revised her memoir, Dust Tracks on a Road. This two-story house sits about a mile west of downtown and today is in need of significant repair. Last November 2019, an article ran on the front page of the St. Augustine Record about a local artist who had painted a mural of Zora Neale Hurston on the house. Artist Mychal Duffey explains that she drives by the house regularly and always thinks of...

Read More

JOIN NOW FOR “NASTY” UPDATES, One post per week in your inbox about a #nastywoman who is inspiring us to write about them.