Author: Theresa C. Dintino

The Chalice and the Blade by Riane Eisler (First published in N.Y. 1987)

If we want to change the world, it is helpful to find out how it was changed in the first place. In other words, what happened to get us to the place we find ourselves now? Was it always like this? No. It was not. Reading The Chalice and the Blade helps you understand how it once was and how the change happened.  Riane Eisler’s main exploration in this book is the difference between partnership societies and dominator societies. Long ago, and not so long ago for many indigenous peoples, humans lived in partnership societies (chalice). Partnership societies are ones in which “social relations...

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Barbara G. Walker and The Women’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets (First published in N.Y. 1983)

This is such a fun book to own. Anything, most anything, especially concerning myths and secrets, that you want the feminist perspective on, you can look up in this book. And if it’s not in this book you will wish it so! It’s more than just the feminist perspective. It’s chock full of extraordinary information. The Women’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets is a must have resource. Entries are cross-referenced, leading you from one to another to find out more and more and more. You can really fall into a rabbit hole of learning, exploring and giggling in this...

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Virginia Woolf and A Room of One’s Own (First published in London, 1929)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) a writer, intellectual and feminist wrote, in her seminal book, A Room of One’s Own: “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction” (4). These words were originally delivered in a talk she was asked to give in 1928 about women and fiction. In the journey of this small book, Woolf allows us into her thought process as she ponders what to say about this topic. She goes to the banks of a river across from “Oxbridge,” a fictionalized version of the renowned Oxford, a place to...

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On Learning How to Share Power, by Theresa C. Dintino

I have spent most of my life trying to empower women. Being in our power means we allow ourselves to be who we truly are and be in that truth, give voice to that truth, at all times. It means having our voices, taking up space, having full access to our dreams, desires and imaginations, knowing how to constructively advocate for ourselves and others. Now I understand that as important as it is for women to find their way back to their true power, it is equally important for women to learn how to share that power. Only when...

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Paula Modersohn-Becker: Women and Ambition, German (1876-1907) by Theresa C. Dintino

What if there were a woman born in the late 1800s with the ambition to paint a way no woman had ever painted before, to paint women in a way women had never been painted before, to bring the female sensibility and perspective to art in a way it had not been seen before? What if that woman had a lot of ambition and fought her position, status and the misogyny and sexism of the day and actually succeeded in doing everything she had set out to do? If there were such a woman and she did accomplish all...

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Ursula K. Le Guin: Women, Writing and Motherhood, American (1929-2018) by Theresa C. Dintino

When I was in my late twenties, there was one essay I read in the New York Times Book Review that moved me so deeply that I immediately signed up for a summer writing workshop where the writer of the essay was teaching. It was not like me to go to writing workshops anymore at that age.  I was in complete burnout with the workshop culture from my college writing program and the many writing workshops I had gone to after. I was what I would call a “beginning writer” at that point, trying to find my authentic voice,...

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Marija Gimbutas: Unearthing the Goddess, Rocking My World, Lithuanian-American (1921-1994) by Theresa C. Dintino

I don’t know that there is any book that changed my life more than Marija Gimbutas’ The Language of the Goddess. I cannot remember what my life was like before I opened this book, before I knew these images, these cultures. Most probably they were always there, buried deep in the layers of my consciousness—women’s prehistory—haunting my dreams and moments of deep repose. Marija’s book offered them context.  And that was not a small thing. That was everything. That is but one part of the importance of her work. It gave these “memories,” these images, that lay at the...

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Adrienne Rich: A Voice that Echoes in My Body, American (1929-2012) by Theresa C. Dintino

Of all the lines written in the English language, the ones that have inspired, moved and meant the most to me are the ones penned by Adrienne Rich. My worn and tattered copy of The Dream of a Common Language, read, loved and turned to so many times, continues to be my favorite book to take off the shelf and revisit. Occasionally, when I remember (or hear as a whisper in my ear) one of the lines from a poem printed in it, my body fills with excitement and deep memory or what could be described as a feeling...

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