Tag: abolitionists

Carol Ruckdeschel: “Tireless defender of sea turtles” (American b. 1941)

I happened to catch a January 13, 2021 For the Wild podcast titled Carol Ruckdeschel on Keeping Cumberland Island Wild. In this interview, Ruckdeschel describes the ongoing fragmentation of the wilderness protections she and others have fought so hard to establish over the years to protect Georgia’s most biologically diverse barrier islands. But the biggest risk for these islands and their inhabitants is the looming development of Spaceport Camden, a proposed rocket launch site in Camden County, Georgia. I urge you to listen to the podcast and scroll to the bottom of this For the Wild page to the Take Action section...

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Matilda Joslyn Gage: In Her Name, American (1826-1898)

A few weeks back, I came upon a term I had not heard before, the ‘Matilda Effect’. It’s defined as: a bias against acknowledging the achievements of those women scientists whose work is attributed to their male colleagues (Wikipedia). This term was coined by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter in 1993, in her essay The Matthew Matilda Effect in Science. The Matthew Effect, labeled in 1948 and credited to Robert K Merton, and later to Harriet Zuckerman as well, refers to the way that: eminent scientists will often get more credit than a comparatively unknown researcher, even if their...

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Polly Coppinger’s Son: Osceola,”Master Spirit of the Seminole Nation” (1804-1838)

National Indigenous Peoples Day is being celebrated across the United States this week. Malinda Maynor Lowery, professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill, in her article The Native History of Indigenous Peoples Day, relays, “More and more towns and cities across the country are electing to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day as an alternative to—or in addition to—the day intended to honor Columbus’ voyages…The growing recognition and celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day actually represents the fruits of a concerted, decades-long effort to recognize the role of Indigenous people in the nation’s history.” You can read Lowery’s full article here. In the spirit of...

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Books, Glorious Books: May you know them and read them!

Books, in any and all formats, are human evolution’s most valuable resource. Books invite us into the minds of people, from those who lived thousands of years ago to those who live among us today. Books both reflect and shape our world and if consumed as the invaluable resource they are, guide us. But that is something you already know. Here’s something you may not… Being very fond of Margaret Fuller, every now and then I browse the Margaret Fuller Society website. Recently, this led me to their Facebook page which yielded a surprising discovery. On August 26 of...

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Breaking the Bronze Ceiling: One Inspiring Public Sculpture at a Time!

We have entered a monumental month: August 2020. August 26, 2020, is the centennial of the ratification of the 19th amendment, which guarantees women the right to vote. On May 19, 1919, the 19th amendment proposed to the Constitution extended the right of suffrage to women. The article reads: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” On August 18, 1920, the needed 36th state (Thank you, Tennessee!) signed on to the amendment and it was officially certified a...

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