Tag: black history

Kamala Harris: A Nasty Woman in the White House

What I love the most about Kamala Harris is how much other women love her. When she was first nominated for vice president on the presidential ticket of Joe Biden, I watched Rachel Maddow interview other women, many of them in positions of power and politics, about it and the response was sheer glee. The Indian-American women she interviewed were over the moon. The smiles on these women’s faces were large, genuine and infectious. As time moved forward, when I would hear prominent women running non-profits or holding high office interviewed asked about her nomination, many of them confessed...

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Edmonia Lewis(1844-1907): An American Sculptor Trapped in Structures Harder Than Marble

Edmonia Lewis had two problems. One: that she was not white and two: that she was not male. She defies classification while at the same time has been classified over and over again. If she can’t be classified, then she is demonized and if she can’t be demonized then she is erased and if she can’t be erased then she is blamed when all this woman wanted was to pursue her art, be taken seriously, be free to compete on a level playing field with other people: meaning white people — and people who were taken seriously by the...

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Toni Morrison’s Beloved: Slavery and the Haunting that Persists.

Toni Morrison’s Beloved is a novel about the enslavement of Black Americans and its lasting emotional, physical and psychic effects. It takes place in Cincinnati, Ohio right before and after the Civil War. Beloved is the story of Sethe, a woman so strong, she survives the unthinkable, over and over and over again. Beloved is the name of the angry baby girl haunting the home of her younger sister, Denver, and Sethe, the mother who murdered her. The ghost, in her eighteen-month-old, non-physical form has driven everyone else out of the house, including Sethe’s two sons whom she tried...

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Cracking the Code: Civil Rights Activist Sarah Patton Boyle (American 1906-1994)

Out for a neighborhood walk a while back, I stopped to read a plaque in front of a house. The plaque is part of a Civil Rights Project in St. Augustine, Florida called the Accord  Freedom Trail whose mission is “Remembering, Recognizing, and Honoring all those who risked their lives to attain civil rights for all and celebrating St. Augustine’s pivotal role in the Civil Rights Act of 1964.” This sign identifies the then residents of the house, Reverend Roscoe and Flora Halyard, and commends their commitment to the struggle to pass the Civil Rights Act. And there is another...

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Breaking the Bronze Ceiling: One Inspiring Public Sculpture at a Time!

We have entered a monumental month: August 2020. August 26, 2020, is the centennial of the ratification of the 19th amendment, which guarantees women the right to vote. On May 19, 1919, the 19th amendment proposed to the Constitution extended the right of suffrage to women. The article reads: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” On August 18, 1920, the needed 36th state (Thank you, Tennessee!) signed on to the amendment and it was officially certified a...

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